Port of Singapore — Construction and architecture

The Port of Singapore refers to the collective facilities and terminals that conduct maritime trade, and which handle Singapore‘s harbours and shipping. It is ranked as the top maritime capital of the world, since 2015. Currently the world’s second-busiest port in terms of total shipping tonnage, it also trans-ships a fifth of the world’s shipping containers, half of the world’s annual supply of crude oil, and […]

machine-shop-repair
Vulcan hammers gained their reputation in part because they were simple, thus free from breakdown and repairable to a great extent on a derrick barge with crews that were not full time mechanics. However, there eventually came a time when a hammer needed an overhaul. Vulcan field service personnel spent a great deal of time on these kind of extended repairs, where it was necessary to put the hammer into a machine shop, disassemble the hammer, clean and recondition the workings, and reassemble the hammer. A hammer with extended exposure to salt water could prove difficult to disassemble; shown here is a Vulcan 200C getting that kind of treatment in a machine shop in East Asia. Note the use of a jack–common with this kind of equipment–to force the components of the machine apart.

Singapore and its environs was an important place for Vulcan, because it was the gateway–and frequently the repair place, as you can see on the right–for many of the Vulcan hammers that operated in Southeast Asia.  Southeast Asia, with its large regions of relatively shallow water, was fertile ground for Vulcan hammers.  Many of Vulcan’s customers–including McDermott, Jardine and Brunei Shell–used its equipment extensively in this region.

via Port of Signapore — Construction and architecture

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