Vulcan 020 Hammer: Specifications and Information

The 020 hammer, derived from the 200C hammer, is an important part of Vulcan’s product line.  A big hammer when it was introduced, it was key in making Vulcan a serious participant in the offshore hammer market, and also with larger onshore and marine projects as well.  It was also the progenitor for hammers such as the 520, 030, 530 and 535.

General arrangements are below.  The 020 was originally developed as an onshore hammer (the photo at the top of the page shows one in on the job) with 37″ jaws.  If the hammer had a significant weakness, it was that: the jaws were too small to accommodate more than 30″ concrete pile or 36″ steel pipe pile.

The offshore hammer sported 54″ male jaws and could drive up to 48″ steel pipe pile.

The first offshore 020 was made for Ingram Contractors in 1965.  Many offshore contractors purchased and used the hammers, including McDermott, DeLong, Teledyne Movable Offshore, Fluor and ETPM, along with onshore contractors such as T.L. James, Boh Brothers, Contratistas Costaneros and J.H. Pomeroy.

And the specifications:

Like the 014 and 016, the 020 wandered between the raised and lowered steam chest design, and also whether the hammer had a steam belt or not.  Steam belts allowed the air or steam to pass from one side of the hammer to another.  For onshore hammers, this allowed the steam chest to be run on the inside of the leaders.  Offshore hammers traditionally ran their steam chest in front (outside) of the leaders, which means that they dispensed with the steam belt.

Also, like the 200C, the 020 had two different sizes of ram points for onshore and offshore hammers, although with two different sizes of cushion pots.

If you have one of these hammers and want to order parts or rehabilitate the hammer, get the serial number and make sure which configuration you’re ordering for.

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